The Darkroom

Being in a darkroom is like entering a unique domain. There’s a specific system. Time moves significantly slower so that when you get back to the outside world you’ve easily lost hours. The smell is a mix of the chemicals required to make your images appear, developer, stop bath, and fixer. Considering the toxicity it’s not something one should get too used to but for me it’s become a comforting aroma. The light is a low amber color because of the light sensitivity of the photographic paper. The need for near darkness adds to the calming affects of the process. It’s not a difficult procedure to learn however the cost of the materials makes you vary weary of mistakes. After you’ve exposed your paper to the desired image and placed it in the first tray of chemicals, you watch as the picture slowly reveals itself. It’s interesting to watch beginners do this for the first time the look on their face is usually one of awe. Digital provides instant gratification but film makes you wait to see if you’ve obtained the desired results. When you have to spend more time and effort adjusting the many components there’s a greater sense of satisfaction when it finally turns out perfect.

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The Forward Thinking Museum

A few years ago I interned for a non-profit called the Joy of Giving Something and their mission is to advance the arts in education, specifically photography. They have contests for high school students with various prizes. They also instituted the Forward Thinking Museum, which is a virtual museum for photography. The stakes are higher here for amateur and professional photographers. If you win their quarterly contest you get your own virtual solo-exhibit and $1000. The annual winners are awarded the JGS Artist Awards in the amount of $5000. So if you think your work represents the current state of the world and how it can be transformed check out the Forward Thinking Museum and enter, the next deadline is December 31, 2013. Even if your work doesn’t fall into this realm check out the website for some excellent photographs and SPREAD THE WORD!

 

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Julia Margaret Cameron

I finally got around to seeing the Julia Margaret Cameron exhibit at the MET. Though the selection was smaller than I expected it was definitely worth going. Cameron only started photographing when she was 48 years old but her portraits are excellent. She knew some celebrities in her time like Charles Darwin and Sir John Herschel. And like any great artist she wasn’t appreciated in her own time because she didn’t follow the conventional rules of photography. Some of her work was staged images of religious scenes, which I didn’t particular care for. However her portraits were exceptional. Even the ones that were dark and blurry held so much emotion and movement. Many of them had a ghost-like quality but still captured the life of the subject. I wish the MET was able to show more of her work but I encourage everyone to go see it. It’ll be up till January 5, 2014.

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Cemeteries

As creepy as it sounds, I love to spend time in and photograph cemeteries. Especially the older ones like Cypress Hills and Calvary, where there is an enormous variety of headstones and mausoleums. Some headstones have old black and white photos of the deceased embedded in them. Some mausoleums have stained glass that is almost completely intact. You can encounter graves going back to the early 1800s. The state of the graves can vary from pristine to completely decrepit. Similar to my fascination with urban decay you can feel the history and see how time and nature reclaims everything.

 

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100 Cameras

100 Cameras is a non-profit organization that believes in using photography to help change a community. 100 Cameras supplies kids in marginalized communities with cameras to photograph their surroundings so that they can share their story. This is an organization that understands and is utilizing the power of photography.  Learn more at 100cameras.org

Here’s a short video that further illustration what they do  http://vimeo.com/38934337

Wet Plate Photography

Wet plate photography is a nearly extinct method that was developed in the late 1800s. The process uses glass or metal plates to capture the image. It requires a chemical bonding agent called collodion and silver nitrate, which is what makes the plate light sensitive. While wet the plate is placed in the camera for exposure. The plate is then developed and fixed like film; the plate becomes your negative to make prints off of.

Ian Ruhter is a modern day photographer who has devoted his life to traveling around and utilizing wet plate photography. He turned a van into one large camera so he can produce large-scale images on the road. It is a complicated and difficult process but when it works its extremely rewarding.

Here’s a link to a video explaining who Ian Ruhter is and what he does.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCFzNND74oo

Urban Decay

I’m drawn to photograph urban decay and industrial areas. Places that most people consider ugly I find to be endlessly beautiful. You can feel the history radiating from these sites. They’ve been abandoned, no longer considered productive and left to be reclaimed by the surrounding nature. These places are forgotten and often times will eventually be leveled and replaced by a new building that looks as uninspiring as all other contemporary structures. When I see areas like this I don’t see wasted space I see a missed opportunity for people to keep their history alive and I have to record what is left.

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Pinhole Cameras

You can make your camera using something as simple as a shoebox. These are called pinhole cameras because your make-shift lens is literally a hole made by a pin or sewing needle. The body needs to be completely light tight and you need to have a secure shutter. Then you just need a darkroom to load and unload the photo paper. Here’s a link to a site called Instructables that gives you step by step directions on how to construct your own pinhole camera. This site is a great resources for any DIY projects.

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